TLC Real Estate



Posted by TLC Real Estate on 1/7/2022

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Many people own homes through a mortgage agreement. Traditional mortgages are primarily fully amortized or gradually paid off with regular payments over the lifetime of the loan. Each payment contributes to both the principal and the interest.

A balloon mortgage is a short-term home loan with fixed-rate monthly payments that only take care of accrued interest on the loan for a set period. It also has a large “balloon” payment to cover the rest of the principal.

The payment plan is based mainly on a fifteen- or thirty-year mortgage, with small monthly payments until the due date for the balloon payment. These low regular payments partly cover the loan but require paying the remainder of the unpaid principal as a lump sum. Selling the house or refinancing the balloon loan before the payment is due is how most buyers approach this situation.

Key Issues with Balloon Mortgages

Lenders present a deadline by which the balloon payment is due (three- to seven-year period). The enormous amount is often more than borrowers can easily handle at once.

Paying only interest on a loan does not allow equity to build. Many homeowners use equity as a means to complete home improvements or other projects. Building equity also helps homeowners when it comes time to sell their home because a traditional mortgage reduces over time. 

Why People Opt for Balloon Loans

It is possible to refinance a balloon mortgage or sell the property before the balloon payment is due but it can be difficult to do so. A dry housing market, job loss, or low credit score are potential obstacles. Lay-offs and depressed home values can trap buyers in their balloon loans. Without the option to sell, refinance, or fulfill their balloon payments, borrowers may end up in foreclosure.

The One True Strategy

Traditional loans are generally safer than balloon mortgages. To keep housing costs at a minimum, use a balloon mortgage if you are sure you can exit before the balloon payment comes due. Otherwise, it is best to remain in the realm of traditional loans.

Review the pros and cons of taking a balloon loan before committing to it. Speak to your financial planner or realtor for professional guidance.




Tags: Mortgage   Financing   homebuyers  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by TLC Real Estate on 8/28/2020

Photo by Brett Sayles from Pexels

Before you can get a VA loan or a VA-backed loan through the Department of Veterans’ Affairs, you'll first apply for a Certificate of Eligibility (COE). You must have served a certain number of days, depending on when you served, and you must have an honorable discharge if you are a veteran. You can find in-depth VA eligibility requirements and complete a COE on the VA’s website.

Types of VA Loans

If you are a Native American veteran, you might be eligible for the Native American Direct Loan Program. The home must be an existing structure or a new build on Native American trust lands. You can use the loan to finance or re-finance. Additionally, your tribal organization has to be a part of the VA direct loan program. This is the only direct VA loan offered.

The Purchase Loans and Cash-Out Refinance Loans are guaranteed by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs. You get these loans from a lender who offers VA-backed loans. If you are active duty, your spouse or dependents may also be eligible. As with any other loan, you must meet income and credit standards.

The Interest Rate Reduction Refinance Loan is only available to those with a current VA-backed loan. If you are eligible for a lower interest rate, you can refinance with this type of loan to lower your interest rate.

Additionally, veterans who have total and permanent disabilities that are service-connected might be entitled to an Adapted Housing Grant. You can get money to add ramps and make other modifications to help you live on your own with a disability, or you can build a house that will allow you to live on your own because it is specially adapted to your disability.

How a VA-Guaranteed Loan Works

The Department of Veterans’ Affairs guarantees part of the loan that you get from a private lender. If you foreclose on the property, the government pays the lender for part of the loan you defaulted on. You can often get a VA-backed loan without a down payment because the VA guarantees the loan. In other cases, you might get a lower interest rate.

If a lender works with the VA to get you a loan, the lender must follow the VA’s standards for closing the loan. Standards might include a limit on how low your credit score can be. As with most loans, you will most likely have to get an appraisal before the loan closes.

Homes must also adhere to standards for inspections. If a home does not pass the VA’s inspection, you can either make the repairs or have the seller make the repairs. You will most likely have to have a second inspection to certify that the home now meets the VA’s standards.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by TLC Real Estate on 4/4/2014

Having a baby can be a very expensive venture. A 2012 report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture says raising a child from birth through age 17 will cost a typical middle-income family a whopping $235,000. That is a lot of money so it is important to plan for your financial future, prepare for your new baby and protect your growing family. Here are some tips to get you and your family on the right track: 1. Purchase life insurance. You will need life insurance to protect your family. It is not as expensive as you think and you will get better rates when you're young. Talk to your life insurance company about what amount of insurance you will need to protect your family. 2. Start planning for college. It may seems years away but you need to start college planning right away. According to the College Board, the average cost of tuition and fees for the 2011-12 school year was $8,244 for a public college and $28,500 for a private one, 3. Update your will. If you have a will you will need to update it and appoint a guardian for your child. If you do not gave a will now is the time to get one. 4. Prepare your baby budget. Babies are expensive, from diapers to child care you will need to look at how your baby will affect everyday expenses. Go to the store and price out diapers and other baby items, consider if you will be living on one income or paying for child care, this will help you figure out if you need to cut spending to afford your new baby. 5. Use a flexible spending account. If your employer offers a flexible spending account, you may be able to use it to pay up to $5,000 in child-care expenses a year. You can also use flexible spending account for health care costs. Money in a flexible spending account is exempt from income taxes. While having a baby is expensive it is also exciting. It may also be a time when you are considering a housing change.







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